Overview Of Diabetes


Diabetes Monitoring

Self monitoring of blood glucose is considered as an effective tool for the management of diabetes, especially for those who require insulin treatment.

Self blood glucose monitoring allows you to know your blood glucose level at any time and helps prevent the consequences of very high or very low blood sugar. Monitoring also enables tighter blood sugar control, which decreases the long term risks of diabetic complications.

The following steps include general guidelines for testing blood sugar levels; you should get specific details for your glucose monitors from the package insert or from your doctor or a specialised nurse. Never share blood glucose monitoring equipment or finger stick lancing devices. Sharing of this equipment could result in transmission of infection, such as Heaptitis B.

  • Wash hands with soap and warm water. Dry the hands.
  • Prepare the lancing device by inserting a fresh lancet. Lancets that are used more than once are not sharp as a new lancet, and can cause more pain and injury to the skin.
  • Prepare the blood glucose meter and test strips.
  • Use the lancing device to obtain a small drop of blood from your fingertip. If you have difficulty getting a good drop of blood from the fingertip, try rinsing your fingers with warm water, shaking the hand below the waist or squeezing the fingertip.
  • Apply the blood drop to the test strip in the blood glucose meter. The results will be displayed on the meter after several seconds.
  • Dispose of the used lancet in a puncture resistant sharps container.

Following are the routine monitoring tests for a diabetic patient during clinic visits;

Blood Glucose   - Controlled (HbA1c < 7%) – every 3 months

   - Uncontrolled – every 2 weeks until target sugars achieved

   HbA1c                - Controlled (HbA1c < 7%) – 6 months to 1 year

                              - Uncontrolled – every 3 months

   Test for neuropathy

   Monofilament                     - Annual

   Biothesiometer                   - Annual

   Foot examination               - Once in 3 months

 

   Testing  for Eyes

   Fundus examination          - Annually. If evidence of retinopathy detected at first visit,      

                                                follow-up every 3-6months  

Test for Nephropathy

Urinay albumin          - Annual

Serum Creatinine       - Annual

 

Miscellaneous Tests

ECG                                - Annual

Treadmill Test                  - By 5 years after onset of Diabetes, then once in 2 years

Lipid Profile (cholesterol)- Annual, If abnormal every 6 months

Overview Of Diabetes


Diabetes Monitoring

Self monitoring of blood glucose is considered as an effective tool for the management of diabetes, especially for those who require insulin treatment.

Self blood glucose monitoring allows you to know your blood glucose level at any time and helps prevent the consequences of very high or very low blood sugar. Monitoring also enables tighter blood sugar control, which decreases the long term risks of diabetic complications.

The following steps include general guidelines for testing blood sugar levels; you should get specific details for your glucose monitors from the package insert or from your doctor or a specialised nurse. Never share blood glucose monitoring equipment or finger stick lancing devices. Sharing of this equipment could result in transmission of infection, such as Heaptitis B.

  • Wash hands with soap and warm water. Dry the hands.
  • Prepare the lancing device by inserting a fresh lancet. Lancets that are used more than once are not sharp as a new lancet, and can cause more pain and injury to the skin.
  • Prepare the blood glucose meter and test strips.
  • Use the lancing device to obtain a small drop of blood from your fingertip. If you have difficulty getting a good drop of blood from the fingertip, try rinsing your fingers with warm water, shaking the hand below the waist or squeezing the fingertip.
  • Apply the blood drop to the test strip in the blood glucose meter. The results will be displayed on the meter after several seconds.
  • Dispose of the used lancet in a puncture resistant sharps container.

Following are the routine monitoring tests for a diabetic patient during clinic visits;

Blood Glucose   - Controlled (HbA1c < 7%) – every 3 months

   - Uncontrolled – every 2 weeks until target sugars achieved

   HbA1c                - Controlled (HbA1c < 7%) – 6 months to 1 year

                              - Uncontrolled – every 3 months

   Test for neuropathy

   Monofilament                     - Annual

   Biothesiometer                   - Annual

   Foot examination               - Once in 3 months

 

   Testing  for Eyes

   Fundus examination          - Annually. If evidence of retinopathy detected at first visit,      

                                                follow-up every 3-6months  

Test for Nephropathy

Urinay albumin          - Annual

Serum Creatinine       - Annual

 

Miscellaneous Tests

ECG                                - Annual

Treadmill Test                  - By 5 years after onset of Diabetes, then once in 2 years

Lipid Profile (cholesterol)- Annual, If abnormal every 6 months