Diet Advice


Fats

Dietary fats and cooking oils are of great importance in Diabetes. Using the right type and quantity of fats is important in preventing the most fatal complications of Diabetes, namely cardiovascular disease.

Fat is essential to the body as it is a concentrated source of energy (1g = 9kcals). It is stored in the body to be used during starvation or prolonged fasting and has several other functions. Dietary fat is obtained from almost all food except fruits and vegetables.

People generally equate fats with cholesterol. All fats do not contain cholesterol. Cholesterol is present only in animal products like milk and milk products, meats like chicken with skin, mutton, egg yolk etc. Cholesterol is not present in any plant or vegetable oils, nuts, pulse or in any of the vegetables or fruits.

In a healthy diet, unsaturated fat should be as minimal as possible. A combination of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated oils should be used in equal proportion. The normal recommendation is about 500ml of oil a month for a person, which is approximately 15-20ml oil (3-4 tsp) per day.

Toned milk (3% of fat) or skimmed milk and milk products is preferable to whole or full cream milk.

Nuts are good sources of monounsaturated fat, protein and fibre. A handful of nuts like almonds, peanuts, walnuts, pistachios which are not fried or salted can be included as a part of a healthy diet on a regular basis. Overweight people need to watch out, as nuts are high calories.

One of the concerns in the recent times is the increasing consumption of Trans-fats. These are obtained by solidification of oils and used in Low-cholesterol butter, margarine, spreads and in food processing industry. The rising trend to go for fast foods which are usually made from these fats is a cause for alarm as Trans fats increase blood cholesterol levels even more than saturated fats.

So foods prepared at home, with minimum oil, are always healthy and nutritious.

Dietary fats are classified as Saturated fats, Monounsaturated fats and Polyunsaturated fats.

Visible added while cooking

  • Refined oil (All kinds)
  1. Oils with SFA – Ghee, butter, palm oil, palmolein oil and coconut oil
  2. Oils with PUFA – Sunflower oil, safflower oil and cottonseed oil
  3. Oils with MUFA – Olive oil, mustard oil, groundnut oil, gingelly oil and rice bran oil
  4. Oils with alpha linoleic acid – Flax seed oil, mustard oil, soyabean oil and rice bran oil
  • Desi ghee
  • Cheese
  • Dalda
  • Cream

Invisible present before cooking

  • Fish
  • Chicken
  • Mutton
  • Eggs
  • Milk
  • Nuts
  • Dals
  • Cereals

Diet Advice


Fats

Dietary fats and cooking oils are of great importance in Diabetes. Using the right type and quantity of fats is important in preventing the most fatal complications of Diabetes, namely cardiovascular disease.

Fat is essential to the body as it is a concentrated source of energy (1g = 9kcals). It is stored in the body to be used during starvation or prolonged fasting and has several other functions. Dietary fat is obtained from almost all food except fruits and vegetables.

People generally equate fats with cholesterol. All fats do not contain cholesterol. Cholesterol is present only in animal products like milk and milk products, meats like chicken with skin, mutton, egg yolk etc. Cholesterol is not present in any plant or vegetable oils, nuts, pulse or in any of the vegetables or fruits.

In a healthy diet, unsaturated fat should be as minimal as possible. A combination of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated oils should be used in equal proportion. The normal recommendation is about 500ml of oil a month for a person, which is approximately 15-20ml oil (3-4 tsp) per day.

Toned milk (3% of fat) or skimmed milk and milk products is preferable to whole or full cream milk.

Nuts are good sources of monounsaturated fat, protein and fibre. A handful of nuts like almonds, peanuts, walnuts, pistachios which are not fried or salted can be included as a part of a healthy diet on a regular basis. Overweight people need to watch out, as nuts are high calories.

One of the concerns in the recent times is the increasing consumption of Trans-fats. These are obtained by solidification of oils and used in Low-cholesterol butter, margarine, spreads and in food processing industry. The rising trend to go for fast foods which are usually made from these fats is a cause for alarm as Trans fats increase blood cholesterol levels even more than saturated fats.

So foods prepared at home, with minimum oil, are always healthy and nutritious.

Dietary fats are classified as Saturated fats, Monounsaturated fats and Polyunsaturated fats.

Visible added while cooking

  • Refined oil (All kinds)
  1. Oils with SFA – Ghee, butter, palm oil, palmolein oil and coconut oil
  2. Oils with PUFA – Sunflower oil, safflower oil and cottonseed oil
  3. Oils with MUFA – Olive oil, mustard oil, groundnut oil, gingelly oil and rice bran oil
  4. Oils with alpha linoleic acid – Flax seed oil, mustard oil, soyabean oil and rice bran oil
  • Desi ghee
  • Cheese
  • Dalda
  • Cream

Invisible present before cooking

  • Fish
  • Chicken
  • Mutton
  • Eggs
  • Milk
  • Nuts
  • Dals
  • Cereals